Brian Ridgway | Bethesda Real Estate, Washington Real Estate, Chevy Chase Real Estate


1909#A 37TH ST NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20007  

Rental
$4,150
Price
3
Bedrooms
3
Baths
Sparkling renovation in Burleith with TWO car parking. Totally updated, but charm of the old - Sunny and stylish 2 level home with hardwood floors throughout. New kitchen with granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Breakfast Bar. Kitchen opens to deck and private rear yard. Skylights allow tons of natural light. WALK to shops, restaurants, grocery. Easy transportation into/out of town.



After a move, everything feels fresh and energizing. This is, of course, in part because of the energy that comes with a big change. But it also comes from having a neatly, organized home. In the jumble of packing and unpacking, junk gets tossed and items get new homes. Everything gets a new dedicated area where it belongs. Everything is tidy, as it should be.

So how then can you maintain this wonderful feeling and continue to keep things neat and tidy?

First, you need to make a daily habit of doing a quick clean sweep every day. Whether you do it in the morning, afternoon or before bed isn’t important. What is important is that you do it every day.

Go through the house to make to corral up stray dishes, put items back into their dedicated places, and give homes to those who don’t have one yet.

And if you can’t think of somewhere to put it? Question its purpose and consider either donating or tossing it.

Aim to keep your surfaces clear of items. Allowing things to accumulate is one of the fastest for clutter to quickly take over. Stop it in its track by tidying up when you’re done using this “station” of your home.

Practice not being “lazy”. If you bring your tea to sip on the couch when you leave the room take your mug with you straight to the dishwasher. If you finished the last of the chips put the clip away where it belongs instead of leaving it out on the counter. Put pens back away after using them to jot out notes. Recycle magazines when you're done reading them.

If you find things are building up as clutter quickly you might have too much stuff. Which is okay, it happens!

Decluttering isn’t a one and done process. We need to consistently be assessing the things that collect in our homes and what benefit they are adding to your life. Sometimes we once used all the time have fallen out of favor or need to be repaired/replaced.

Make time once a month for a quick declutter session and once a season for a more detailed one.

And the best way to avoid clutter is to closely monitor what you’re allowing to come into your home in the first place. If you find you love to take things home just because they were free or on sale, it’s important to take a step back and ask yourself why.

After all, the less stuff we have in our homes the less there is to manage. Which means more time spent doing what you enjoy doing, like spending time with your family, and less time organizing it all.

 



Long distance moves can be scary. Living in a new place where you’re unfamiliar with the roads and the people can take some time to get used to. But, whether you’re moving for work or just for a change of scenery, moving to a new part of state or country can be exciting. 

One way to make things easier is to become a tourist for a week or two in your new town before moving. In today’s post, I’m going to fill you in on some ways to become an expert in your new town so that you’ll feel more at home when moving day arrives.

Start your research online

With the use of Google and Google Maps, you can quickly learn the basics of your new town. Look for things like grocery stores, schools, gyms, parks, restaurants and whatever else you might be using on a daily basis. Knowing where these amenities are will help set your mind at ease should you need them in your first few days in your new home. This is also a good opportunity to read some reviews and avoid making poor choices when it comes to eating out or shopping.

Drive or walk like a local

If you’re moving to a new city with public transportation, it will pay off to know how the trains and buses work before moving. Learning how to navigate transportation can save you time in the event of a delay, or cancellation.

If you’re moving to a suburban or rural area, it can still pay off to get to know the roads and have some familiarity with the area. You never know when your phone might die or you’ll lose service, no longer being able to depend on your GPS to get you where you need to go and back home again.

Make friends with your neighbors

It’s often a good idea to say hello and introduce yourself to your soon-to-be neighbors when visiting the area you’ll be moving to. They’ll be able to fill you in on things like traffic and commute times, problems in the neighborhood, and anything else that you’d want to be savvy to before moving in.

They’ll also be able to keep an eye on your home prior to you moving in, as well as when you decide to leave for vacation in the coming years.

Make arrangements for your move

If you’ll need to hire any professionals in the first week of your move, now might be a good time to shop around. Find out who the cable or internet providers are and give them a date of when you would like service installed. The same goes for garbage removal and any other services you’ll need right away.

Keep these tips in mind when touring your new neighborhood so you’ll have less to worry about on moving day and the coming weeks.



Moving day; you’ve waited months for this day to arrive, working hard to make sure you, your family, pets, and belongings are ready for the big move.

With all of the preparations and various people involved, it’s easy for moving day to become dangerous.

To ensure that you and your family have a safe and smooth moving day, I’ve provided some tips that every mover should keep in mind.

Make plans for pets and young children

The last thing you want on the first day in your new home is to be wandering around the neighborhood looking for your dog who slipped away during the move. If possible, make arrangements for pets to stay with friends or family for moving day to make things easier.

If you need to bring your pets along, it’s a good idea to put them in a “playroom” with their toys, water bowl, etc. while you have the door to the house open. Not only will it stop them from running out, but it will also prevent you from tripping over them while you carry the couch.

Don’t be a hero

It’s our tendency to want to do a job ourselves if we want it done right. But, when it comes to moving, that philosophy can lead to a thrown out back and a damper on your plans.

When it comes to getting large and heavy objects in and out of the house, make sure you have at least one other person ready to lift with you.

Stack from heaviest to lightest

It may seem obvious, but in the confusion of a move, it can be easy to pack your truck or van in a less-than-ideal way. Rather than playing Tetris with your boxes, try to focus on weight instead. You don’t want heavy boxes near the roof in case they fall on you or on your other belongings.

Place the largest and heavier items in the van first. This will allow you to plan the rest of the load around them, rather than having to move them around to make room.

Take a breather

As tempting as it may be, you don’t have to finish everything in one day. As long as your truck is locked and secure, it’s okay if you don’t bring in every single box. Resting throughout the day and staying hydrated, especially when moving in the summer, will help you stay sharp and ready to keep working.

Have an emergency plan

If you take precautions, you most likely won’t have to worry about emergencies. However, accidents do happen and it’s best to be prepared for them when they do. If you or a family member requires medication, make sure it’s handy and that everyone knows where it is.

Similarly, label your first aid kit and keep it with your necessities during the move.


If you follow these tips, your moving day should be a simple and safe process and you’ll be enjoying your new home in no time.



While excess moisture and humidity in your basement may seem like more of an annoyance than a serious problem, you might be surprised at the potential consequences of ignoring it. Two negative outcomes, for example, are mold growth and the possibility of foundation damage. Mold Growth: Mold, which tends to grow and thrive in moist environments, is both an eyesore and a potential health hazard. Not everyone is allergic to mold spores, but those who are can experience a variety of uncomfortable symptoms, ranging from eye irritation and sneezing to skin rashes and asthma attacks. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "The key to mold control is moisture control." In the case of plumbing leaks or flooding, fast action is necessary to prevent mold growth. The E.P.A recommends that affected areas be dried out within 24 to 48 hours. Prevention and Control Tactics
  1. Rain gutters on your house can help divert water away from your foundation, which is one factor in preventing basement leaks and excess moisture. When rain gutters are not working properly, it's usually the result of one or two things: 1) clogs caused by leaves and other debris, and 2) downspouts which fail to direct water far enough from the house. Diverting water away from your home can also help protect your foundation from premature cracking of crumbling. Although rain gutters need to be cleaned once or twice a year, there are low maintenance products available which let the rain water in, but keep the leaves out.
  2. Sump pumps: An essential device for wet basements is a sump pump -- preferably the kind that work during extreme weather conditions and power outages. Those are the conditions under which homeowners need a working sump pump the most!
  3. Basement waterproofing solutions: Depending on the extent of your water seepage problem, you may want to consult a basement waterproofing service. Since prices, warranties, and services may vary quite a bit from one company to the next, it would be wise to get a few estimates. Basement waterproofing companies may recommend several options, such as exterior excavation, the installation of new drainage tiles and French drains, and the application of a waterproof membrane on the outside of foundation walls. Interior work may involve the creation of a drainage trench around the perimeter of the basement and the installation of drainage tiles or piping to channel excess water to a sump pump. So as you can imagine, basement waterproofing can be quite expensive. That's why the best strategy is usually a preventative one.
  4. Damage control: One way to help prevent or minimize damage to your home from leaking water pipes or malfunctioning appliances is to have an automatic shutoff mechanism installed in your plumbing system. By detecting and responding to reductions in water pressure, it can turn off water flow at specific locations to keep flooding and property damage to an absolute minimum.
Other than doing everything you can to divert rainwater away from your foundation and being ready to respond to plumbing accidents, another method for controlling moisture is to install a dehumidifier in your basement. A local appliance outlet or large hardware store should be able to recommend a good, reasonably priced dehumidifier for your needs.